Articles tagged with: kalimba tablature

24 December 2016

Songs for the Freygish Karimba - "Coventry Carol"

Written by Mark Holdaway, Posted in News and Announcements

Free Tablature for "Coventry Carol" from the Freygish Download

Songs for the Freygish Karimba -

"Coventry Carol" is a 16th century English Christmas Carol.  It has the haunting feel that some old English music evokes, and as a youth I was charmed by it and used to long to play music such as this song.

This old Christmas carol and the Freygish-tuned karimba were made for each other - both are in the exotic-sounding harmonic minor scale.  This and many other great songs are part of the Freygish Download, and you can get the tablature for "Coventry Carol" free in this article. Let's talk about how this song works.

13 December 2016

Learn to Read Tablature - 1

Written by Mark Holdaway, Posted in News and Announcements

What are these different note symbols, and how long does each one last?

Learn to Read Tablature - 1

In a recent blog post I described the the tablature as a map of the kalimba tines which shows you the right tines to play to accomplish a particular melody or song. If you are a newcomer to reading any kind of music, and find it impossible to know how to "see" tablature, or to know what the different symbols in kalimba tablature really mean, don't despair. 

This blog post is just for you - we talk about what the "tine map" means, look at the different types of notes and how long each kind lasts, and how to understand timing and how to keep time.  We help you make friends with this new language, showing you in tablature and in sound files exactly how to read and play the different notes.

07 January 2017

Learn to Read Tablature - 2

Written by Mark Holdaway, Posted in News and Announcements, Tips

Understanding ties and dots - extending the length of notes

Learn to Read Tablature - 2

Are you having difficulty understanding note and timing symbols in the tablature?

This blog post is just for you - it's the second of our series on learning how to read kalimba tablature.  In the first post, we talked about what the "tine map" means, looked at the different types of notes and how long each kind lasts, and introduced how to understand timing and keeping time.  

This installment of the multi-part series on reading tablature covers the details of the "tie" symbol (a sideways smile) and the "dot" (a dot immediately after - or "above" - any note symbol).  Both the tie and the dot modify the length of the notes they are applied to, resulting in note lengths that we could not indicate using just the basic note types and increasing greatly how music can be communicated using a visual system.

09 November 2016

A New Download for the New B11 Kalimba

Written by Mark Holdaway, Posted in News and Announcements

There is a lot of cool music you can do on this one - we start from the beginning

A New Download for the New B11 Kalimba

Peter Hokema has done it again!  He has created a charming little kalimba that just seems to captivate everyone who hears it, the B11 "Melody" kalimba. 

And Mark Holdaway has done it again, writing an instructional download filled with great music, illustrating many of the wild and wonderful things you can do on the B11 kalimba.

Read on to learn more about the unusual B11 "Melody," to see what kinds of things are in the download, and to hear one of the more advanced songs you can play from the new B11 download.

09 October 2016

The Freygish Karimba Download, Redux

Written by Mark Holdaway, Posted in News and Announcements

NOSTALGIC, SENSUAL, MYSTERIOUS, SWEET.... THIS KALIMBA PLAYS TRULY UNIQUE MUSIC. THE IMPROVED AND ENHANCED DOWNLOAD IS AVAILABLE NOW. IF YOU HAVE IT ALREADY, UPGRADE IT FOR FREE!

The Freygish Karimba Download, Redux

 

"The Freygish-tuned karimba plays delightful songs, mostly in C harmonic minor.  This instrument brings alive baroque melodies and harmonies, romantic music box waltzes, fiery Middle-Eastern music, and hot Latino cumbia - nostalgic, sensual, mysterious and sweet.  This karimba plays unique music that is not played by any other." (From the back cover of the Freygish karimba download.)

The instrument that you can hear right now, which is playing in the video below, is the Freygish karimba, and the song is "Music Box Farewell," which is the last composition in the Freygish Download.

If you don't know about the Freygish Karimba, come on in and listen to what it does and learn a bit about this wonderful gem of an instrument.

17 September 2016

Why Kalimba Tablature? Greensleeves!

Written by Mark Holdaway, Posted in News and Announcements

The tremendous assistance that kalimba tablature can provide in arranging and learning songs...plus a free CD or 25% coupon!

Why Kalimba Tablature?  Greensleeves!

I have a symbiotic relationship with kalimba tablature:  I work really hard to notate really wonderful music in tablature.  Through working on this tablature, I come to be able to play music that is more difficult and more polished than I would otherwise be able to perform.

I make kalimba tablature better, and kalimba tablature makes me better. 

To get your free Greensleeves tablature PDF, which will work for 8-Note, Alto, or Bb Treble kalimbas, click the image above.

18 February 2017

Learn to Read Tablature - 3

Written by Mark Holdaway, Posted in News and Announcements, Tips

Understanding time signatures

Learn to Read Tablature - 3

We have made the point many times that kalimba tablature is a time map - horizontally it shows you different tines, and vertically it shows you different times.  The tablature, like standard music notation, is split up into bite-sized chunks called "measures", and each measure gets the same number of beats.

A measure is like a little piece of the song's "dance".  It is the same size as the natural little rhythmic fragments that keep coming around over and over.  A measure and its time signature will fit naturally with the song and will reflect it's recurrent structure.

 Imagine that a song will reflect a particular way of moving.  That basic manner of motion may have four beats, or three beats, or six beats, or something else.  The cool thing is that the music - or in our world, the tablature - will reflect that basic way of moving.  It is called the "time signature", and you are about to learn all about it.