Articles tagged with: Traditional African

16 September 2016

Playing Kushaura and Kutsinhira Parts on Mbira

Written by Mark Holdaway, Posted in News and Announcements

These two similar parts, one delayed by an eighth note, lean against each other and create something fundamentally new

Playing Kushaura and Kutsinhira Parts on Mbira

The kalimba, as most of us know it, is a new adaptation of the family of African lamellophones that includes the mbira and the karimba.  As such, the kalimba doesn't really have a tradition in Africa.  This is the very reason I am attracted to the instrument. Without a specific African tradition, we are free to create our own new and evolving kalimba styles.

On the extreme opposite end of the "tradition" spectrum from the modern kalimba is the mbira dzavadzimu, or simply, "mbira". The mbira's traditions are strange, quirky, amazing, wonderful, and sometimes downright bizarre all at the same time. One aspect of the mbira's tradition that is never heard in kalimba playing is the doubling of parts in the melody. The leading line is called kushaura, and following line is the kutsinhira.  I invite you to peek inside the amazing world that results when these two parts are put together.

06 September 2016

New, Free Variations to Accompany the Karimba Song "Wa Kalulu"

Written by Mark Holdaway, Posted in News and Announcements

You can learn to create your own variations!

New, Free Variations to Accompany the Karimba Song

I have written before about how much fun it is to find variations that work with traditional African kalimba music. This article elaborates on this subject, and how I went about creating my own variations, first by improvisation, and then later in composition inspired by those earlier improvisations.

Even in the case of songs such as "Wa Kalulu" for which only a standard part notation exists, we can create essentially infinite variations to go along with this music. All it takes is two karimba players, one with a good grasp of the song as written (in the book "30 Traditional African Songs for Karimba" for example) and another player who has several attributes: a fertile imagination, the flexibility to change what they are playing when the music they are playing isn't working with the original part, and the sense to stay put for a while when they stumble on something good.

01 July 2016

Infinite Possibility Within Each Line

Written by Mark Holdaway, Posted in News and Announcements

One single musical idea can be stretched so far...

Infinite Possibility Within Each Line

When I play kalimba by myself, I usually go pretty deep. It's like meditation, only more playful. After playing for 20 or 30 minutes, I am usually in a very peaceful state. I seem to look within while I play, and when I stop playing, I find that I don't quite focus on anything in this physical world. It usually takes me five or ten minutes to re-acclimatize to the world. WARNING: Do not operate heavy machinery while playing kalimba! (So far, there is not a call to raise the legal age for kalimba playing to 21.)

Playing kalimba with someone else can also be a very creative experience, and here I will discuss doing that very thing, using a kalimba song that is historically important to explain and illustrate. 

13 January 2016

Mahororo - a Shona Mbira Song

Written by Mark Holdaway, Posted in News and Announcements

Learn to play this traditional Mbira song on Karimba or Alto Kalimba

Mahororo - a Shona Mbira Song

This is my favorite song from the 11 Advanced Traditional Karimba Songs Download. I think you'll love playing this song as much as I do, and I put together a more accessible version than the original.

"Mahororo" could mean "victory", or it could mean "baboons talking", depending on who you believe (from Ivodne Galatea's notes in the instructional download).

I recently learned this song, and I shifted the notes down a 5th. I include a video I made of Mahororo "freestyle", and I am giving away tablature for this song on the Alto and Karimba.  The tablature has a lot of variations that I don't touch in the freestyle video.