Articles tagged with: Improvisation

01 April 2016

TIP: A Karimba Improvisational Strategy Part 9

Written by Mark Holdaway, Posted in Tips

A left thumb suggestion

TIP: A Karimba Improvisational Strategy Part 9

The goal here is for you to play the right thumb's two-note chord part more or less as written, and to invent your own left thumb part. You may have already been successful with this, or you might feel you have no clue of what to do. If the latter is true, here is a left thumb suggestion for you.

01 April 2016

TIP: A Karimba Improvisational Strategy Part 10

Written by Mark Holdaway, Posted in Tips

Another left thumb suggestion, same right thumb pattern

TIP: A Karimba Improvisational Strategy Part 10

Our objective with these lessons is to give you the tools, understanding, and confidence to improvise with your left thumb while the right thumb "holds down the fort". Here is another suggestion for the type of thing your left thumb could do. The first three measures are almost the same for the left thumb - measure 1 goes up the scale fragment, measure 2 goes down the scale fragment, and measure 3 goes back up. Measure 4 on the left is different, emphasizing B as the first and last note of the little phrase. Again, B is a good note to play here as the right hand is playing a partial E chord.

01 April 2016

TIP: A Karimba Improvisational Strategy Part 11

Written by Mark Holdaway, Posted in Tips

Left thumb dancing in the upper notes

TIP: A Karimba Improvisational Strategy Part 11

Our objective with these lessons is to give you the tools, understanding, and confidence to improvise with your left thumb while the right thumb "holds down the fort". Here is another suggestion for what your left thumb can do - dance in the upper row notes, and between the upper and lower row notes.

01 April 2016

TIP: A Karimba Improvisational Strategy Part 12

Written by Mark Holdaway, Posted in Tips

Starting to branch out

TIP: A Karimba Improvisational Strategy Part 12

You are by no means confined to exactly what we have written down. You can change it up in a thousand different ways to make it your own. Here is a very simple example: instead of playing the chord in each measure twice, this one plays each chord only once, on the opening beat of each measure. Furthermore, the left thumb plays with the right thumb on the opening chords. This complexity is somewhat compensated for by the fact that the right side is doing the same pattern three out of four times.

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